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Posts Tagged ‘Edmonton Real Estate’

The bottom line shows a seasonal down shift of the market.

Wednesday, November 9th, 2016

Edmonton Real Estate Market Reports for November 2016

It’s amazing how the year is almost ending and the holiday season is just a month away.  These days we are kept busy with our winter and early holiday preparation. The real estate market is also experiencing a lot of movement and changes with the governments announcement of the new motgage rules on October 3rd.  We recommend you read our next blog on these recent changes in order to better understand where you stand in the market today.

We remember on November 11, 2016.

The highest compliment you can give me is to recommend me to your friends and family who might be needing some real estate help. Thank you for your referrals!

EDMONTON MARKET REPORT for November

*stats as of October 31, 2016

Last October (2015) we had 2,272 new listings come on the market and a total of 6,641 properties for sale.  This October 2,147 new listings appeared for a total of 7,215 homes on market. This is continuing last years trend with an abundance of properties for sale, and 5.70 months of inventory.

Last October (2015) a total of 1,284 homes sold in the Edmonton area.  This October 1,265 SOLD.  About the same number of sales.

Average Days on Market – 61, last year we were at 56 days, compared to last year homes are selling 8.20% more slow

Odds of Selling -17.53%,  1,265 out of 7,215 listed, down 9.12% from last year, down 5.32% from last month

Average Selling Price:

     Condo Apartment: $245,698

     Condo Townhouse: $332,565

     Single Family Dwelling: $432,755 and the

Average selling price in the City of Edmonton is $364,004.

Down 6.4% from last year and 2.48% less than last month.

Home Sales by Price Range: The highest percentage of properties are and have the tendency in Edmonton to sell in the $300,000-$399,999 price range, and this year 34.37% of homes have sold in this price range. Second position goes to the $400,000-$499,999 price range at 20.40%.  Third place is the $200,000-$299,999 and 20.39%. These haven’t changed very much from month to month as this works in with Edmonton average earnings per family.  It may soon drop a bit with the recent changes to mortgage rules.

54 Years average of price increase for the City of Edmonton is 6.86%.

Prices have gone up for this year by 0.32%. A small reduction in the high end luxury market in Edmonton, in comparison to what is going on in the rest of our province.

Want market information about listings in your area or a free market anaylsis for your home?  Sign up here.

To download your full copy of this report – click here.

Edmonton Real Estate Market Reports November 2016

Edmonton Real Estate Market Reports for October 2016

Thursday, October 27th, 2016

Edmonton Real Estate Market Reports for October 2016

Autumn is upon us which means that winter is soon coming.  Let’s enjoy these last few weeks of harvest and pumpkins, hot apple cider and cinnamon.  As you prepare for Halloween festivites, don’t forget to start winter-proofing your home.

Don’t forget to mention us to anyone who needs real estate help.  We are here and we love your referrals.

EDMONTON MARKET REPORT for October

*stats as of September 30, 2016

Last September (2015) we had 2,747 new listings come on the market and a total of 7,108 properties for sale.  This September 2,739 new listings appeared for a total of 7,857 homes on market. This is continuing last years trend with an abundance of properties for sale, and folks looking to move around at 5.87 months of inventory.

Last September (2015) a total of 1,543 homes sold in the Edmonton area.  This September 1,339 SOLD.  About the same number of sales.

Average Days on Market – 57, last year we were at 54 days, a decrease of 5.26%

Odds of Selling – 1,339 out of 7,857 listed, down 21.28% from last year, down 11.92% from last month

Average Selling Price:

     Condo Apartment: $251,365

     Condo Townhouse: $360,338

     Single Family Dwelling: $430,461and the

Average selling price in the City of Edmonton is $373,926, up 1.53% from last year and up 1.20% from last month.

Home Sales by Price Range: The highest percentage of properties are and have the tendency in Edmonton to sell in the $300,000-$399,999 price range, and this year 34.27% of homes have sold in this price range. Second position goes to the $400,000-$499,999 price range at 20.59%.  Third place is the $200,000-$299,999 and 20.36%. These haven’t changed very much from month to month as this works in with Edmonton average earnings per family.

53 Years average of price increase for the City of Edmonton is 6.86%.

Prices have gone up for this year by 0.59%. A small reduction in the high end luxury market in Edmonton, in comparison to what is going on in the rest of our province.

Want market information about listings in your area or a free market anaylsis for your home?  Sign up here.

To download your full copy of this report – click here.

The Spotlight is on Fall as Edmontons listings’ are Reduced.

Monday, September 26th, 2016

Edmonton Real Estate Market Reports for September 2016

School is in and as the kids focus on their studies, the business world wakes up and the Real Estate market resumes back after the last of summer holidays.  That is the serious folks anyways.  Now is the time where we start to see the listings drop off and the less motivated sellers exit the market.  If you’ve been thinking of selling, now is a great time to get into the market.  Interest rates are the lowest they’ve been and that makes for some interesting shifts in housing. We’ll help you get there. Join our monthly mailing list, send us a quick hello or give us a call and ask your questions.  We’d love to help you.

Don’t forget to mention anyone who needs real estate help.  We are here and we love your referrals.

Judge for yourself, don’t listen to the news!

Last August (2015) we had 2,930 new listings come on the market and a total of 7,227 properties for sale.  This August  2,747 new listings appeared for a total of 7,908 on market. This is continuing last years trend with an abundance of properties for sale, and folks looking to move around at 5.52 months of inventory.

Last August (2015) a total of 1,555 homes sold in the Edmonton area.  This August 1,433 sold.  About the same number of sales.

Average Days on Market – 55, the same as last year, up 1.8% from last month which had 56 DOM

Odds of Selling – 1,433 out of 7,908 listed, down 15.57% from last year, down 11.83% from last month

Average Selling Price:

     Condo Apartment: $251,526, down 3.41% from last month anddown 1.12% from last year.

     Condo Townhouse: $344,337, down 2.02% from last year and 0.36% less than last month.

     Single Family Dwelling: $434,362, down 0.80% from last year and down 3.21% from last month and the

Average selling price in the City of Edmonton is $369,956, down 0.05% from last year and down 3.62% last month.

Home Sales by Price Range: The highest percentage of properties are and have the tendency in Edmonton to sell in the $300,000-$399,999 price range, and this year 34.03% of homes have sold in this price range. Second position goes to the $400,000-$499,999 price range at 20.82%.  Third place is the $200,000-$299,999 and 20.62%. These haven’t changed very much from month to month as this works in with Edmonton average earnings per family.

53 Years average of price increase for the City of Edmonton is 6.86%.

Prices have gone up for this year by 0.62%. A small reduction in the high end luxury market in Edmonton, in comparison to what is going on in the rest of our province.

Want market information about listings in your area or a free market anaylsis for your home?  Sign up here.

To download your full copy of this report – click here.

Cheers and chat soon,  Jeanine

School is around the corner but did YEGRE fail the grade?

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

Edmonton Real Estate Market Reports for August 2016

School is right around the corner and with that, comes the end of the push for Edmonton families to get into their new homes by the start of the school year.  The last little bit of holidays and vacations are coming to a close, but is the Edmonton Real Estate market fading?  No, not so much. lol. If you watch the news, local or national you will get some supporting stories and some contradictory stories, but in the end, they are all stories.  Thoughts coming out of someone elses’ imaginations, studies, education and opinions.  However, there’s one thing you can’t change and that’s the facts.  Is Edmonton doing as poorly as they say it is?

Judge for yourself!

If you, your friends or family are looking to buy or sell Real Estate, please refer them to me.  Your referral is the best compliment I can receive.

Last July (2015) we had 2,895 new listings come on the market and a total of 7,226 properties for sale.  This is continuing last years trend with an abundance of properties for sale, at 5.31 months of inventory.

Last July (2015) a total of 1,889 homes sold in the Edmonton area.  This February 1,515 sold.  About the same number of sales.

Average Days on Market – 56, down 8.9% from last year, down 5.4% from last month

Odds of Selling – 1,515 out of 8,048 listed, down 29.14% from last year, down 18.82% from last month

Average Selling Price:

     Condo Apartment: $257,482, down 1.91% from last month and up 0.5% from last year.

     Condo Townhouse: $348,050, down 1.39% from last year and 2.29% less than last month.

     Single Family Dwelling: $450,366, up 3.07% from last year and up 3.51% from last month and the

     Average selling price in the City of Edmonton is $384,504, up 3.33% from last year and up 188% from last month.

Home Sales by Price Range: The highest percentage of properties are and have the tendency in Edmonton to sell in the $300,000-$399,999 price range, and this year 34.17% of homes have sold in this price range. Second position goes to the $400,000-$499,999 price range at 21.10%.  Third place is the $200,000-$299,999 and 20.36%. These haven’t changed very much from month to month as this works in with Edmonton average earnings per family.

53 Years average of price increase for the City of Edmonton is 6.87%.

Prices have gone up for this year by 0.77%. Give it a few months and I predict we will see the same prices as last year, with a small reduction in the high end luxury market in Edmonton

Want market information about listings in your area or a free market anaylsis for your home?  Sign up here.

To download your full copy of this report – click here.

Cheers and chat soon,  Jeanine

Edmonton Real Estate Market Reports for July 2016

Friday, July 15th, 2016

Edmonton Real Estate Market Reports for July 2016

What is YEG’s Real Estate Market revealing after the fire?

Friday, May 20th, 2016

So much has been going on in this province of ours in the Last couple of weeks.  Poor, young Fort McMurray, what happened is horrible, and it’s outcome has far reaching effects across Canada and the Globe.

Oil and Gas prices have been tanking for awhile now, and a larger majority of the population has been asking to move for the last year or so.  30 percent more than usual in fact.  Yet with all the dump in Oil and Gas profits, Canada saw increasing growth in one of it’s life-savers within an economic ocean; Real Estate. Despite the low toonie, the average price for a Canadian home in US funds hit an all time high. Canadian home sales broke the April high.  The average price for a Vancouver Condominium is $925/ft2. Oh my goodness.

Edmonton is floating in the middle, less expensive than our Vancouver, Calgary and Toronto sisters, and still doing well in it’s own right.  In fact, of the 4,577 homes sold to date this year in Edmonton, only 13.53% are priced over $500,000.

Many rentals in Edmonton have been taken to help house some of the people displaced from Fort McMurray, but almost none are ready to turn around and buy again.  Prices of homes, steadily rise in Edmonton, even after all this, we are only down 1% on our average selling price in Edmonton, not bad for the tanking o&g prices and our latest natural disaster.

At 40 days on market, homes aren’t flying off the shelves in a modest day or two like in 2005, but it’s definitely not hanging around like winter inventory.

As a Seller, you’ll want to know that the Listing absorption rate is only 19.85%.  Meaning another 80.15% of homes listed this month, did not sell, they expired, terminated or just sat on the market for another 30 days. Which means, the est thing i can do is give you tips to sell your home quick.

No question is too small – Contact us today!

Sincerely,

Jeanine

Download your full copy of this months report in pdf version here.

How Awesome is the Edmonton Real Estate Market in Spring?

Thursday, April 14th, 2016

It’s on fleek…  

Hi Folks,

Here’s spring and here’s the spring market.  Lots of listings and a good number of sales which can be expected in this traditional moving season. I’m personally looking forward to planting flowers around the may long weekend, Cannas’ please, I love those.  Along with the flowering buds, blue skies, babies and marriages comes spring cleaning, space planning and relocation.  The weather is nice folks, and so is our market.

If you, your friends or family are looking to buy or sell Real Estate, please keep me in mind.  Your referral is the best compliment I can receive.

Now, the Edmonton Real Estate Statistics for April 2016.

March of 2016 ended with a total of 7,294 properties for sale in the Greater Edmonton area.  3,082 New listings came fresh to market this month.  Last March (2015) we had 3,152 new listings come up for sale and a total of 5,944 properties for sale.  That buyers market we’ve been talking about had reduced a bit, and it’s sitting at about 5.35 months of inventory, down afew months inventory from just last month.  That means, PROPERTIES ARE SELLING AND FOLKS ARE STILL BUYING.

Last March (2015) a total of 1,532 homes sold in the Edmonton area.  This March 1,364 sold.  About the same number of sales.

What are the Average Days on Market in Edmonton? –

53, up from 45 days in 2015 (15% slower)  and down from 57 days in February 2016 (7.6% faster)

What are your Odds of Selling your house in Edmonton?

1,364 out of 7,294 listed – or 18.7%

What is the Average Selling Price of homes in Edmonton?

     Condo Apartment: $251,093 up 1.8% from last month and up 0.6% from last year.

     Condo Townhouse: $337,986  down 4.3% from last month and 5.0% less than last year.

     Single Family Dwelling: $439,815  up 5.5% from last month and up 0.6% from last year and the

     Average selling price in the City of Edmonton is $379,524 up 5.31% from last month up 1.9% from last year.

What price range of homes can most Edmontonians afford? 

The highest percentage of properties are and have the tendency in Edmonton to sell in the $300,000-$399,999 price range, and this year 34.04% of homes have sold in this price range. Second position goes to the $200,000-$299,999 and 21.44% Third place is the $400,000-$499,999 price range at 12.5%.  This is the first month in about six that I have seen the $200,000 price bracket land in second position, rather than third.  The four hunderd range switched places with this group, a sign of things to come?

53 Years average of price increase for the City of Edmonton ijust dropped to 6.81% from 6.83% previously recorded.

Prices have gone down for this year by 2.11%, statistically speaking, much of the average price ‘decrease’ would be due to the fact that we haven’t seen the sales from the full spring and summer market enter into the stats.  Give it a few months and I predict we will see the same prices as last year, with a small exception in the high end luxury market in Edmonton

Want market information about listings in your area or a free market anaylsis for your home?  Sign up here.

To download your full copy of this report – click here.

Cheers and chat soon,  Jeanine

People Actually Reduced Time on Market at the Turn of Spring.

Thursday, March 17th, 2016

Hi Folks,

Can you see it?  Spring is just around the corner and so is the Home Buying and Selling Hot Season.   I have friends across this great Province of ours; and throughout Alberta locations are experiencing different results after the plunge in Oil and Gas stocks.  Often, I can be overheard telling folks that the Edmonton region wasn’t hit hard like some of our other Oil and Gas cities.  So for my Edmonton peeps and those that are trying to get here from other cities, everything is fine, our market is fine, prices haven’t tanked, we aren’t headed for disaster and the downturn has barely even showed up in the stats we look at.  Here’s a good fact for you to help make up your own decision on todays’ market: The City of Edmonton average SOLD price, Family Home average sold price as well as Condos both apartment and townhouse styled all went up in price, while days on market went down.  Sounds like a spring fling to me.

If you, your friends or family are looking to buy or sell Real Estate, please keep me in mind.  Your referral is the best compliment I can receive.

And now the stats:

Last February (2015) we had 2,407 new listings come up for sale and a total of 5,008 properties for sale.  February of 2016 ended with a total of 6,681 properties for sale in the Greater Edmonton area.  2,765 New listings came fresh to market this year.  This is the strongest buyers market that I have seen in a few years and is continuing last years trend, at 7.98 months of inventory. Last month was topping the Buyer charts at 8.03 months of inventory, almost long enough to have a baby! lol

Last February (2015) a total of 1,026 homes sold in the Edmonton area.  This February 813 sold.  About the same number of sales.

Average Days on Market – 57, down 15.8% from last year, up 24.6% from last month

Odds of Selling – 837 out of 6,6681 listed, down 38.64% from last year, up 2.78% from last month

Average Selling Price:

     Condo Apartment: $247,090, up 8.8% from last month and down 1.3% from last year.

     Condo Townhouse: $354,386, up 1.2% from last year and 8.7% more than last month.

     Single Family Dwelling: $419,940, down 2.8% from last year and up 0.9% from last month and the

     Average selling price in the City of Edmonton is $363,266, down 0.3% from last year and up 6.86% from last month.

Home Sales by Price Range: The highest percentage of properties are and have the tendency in Edmonton to sell in the $300,000-$399,999 price range, and this year 33.42% of homes have sold in this price range. Second position goes to the $400,000-$499,999 price range at 19.90%.  Third place is the $200,000-$299,999 and 22.82%. These haven’t changed very much from month to month as this works in with Edmonton average earnings per family.

53 Years average of price increase for the City of Edmonton is 6.98%.

Prices have gone down for this year by 5.25%, statistically speaking, much of the average price ‘decrease’ would be due to the fact that we haven’t seent he sales from the full spring market enter into the stats.  Give it a few months and I predict we will see the same prices as last year, with a small exception in the high end luxury market in Edmonton

Want market information about listings in your area or a free market anaylsis for your home?  Sign up here.

To download your full copy of this report – click here.

Cheers and chat soon,  Jeanine

Broken Windows: an interesting Theory on Crime in Edmonton.

Tuesday, February 9th, 2016

Hi Folks,

Some of you may have read Malcolms’ book the Tipping Point and you can relate to the lessons we can find within the story.  I like this Theory.  I like that it becomes an expression of how well the community is cared for and how much care the residents show for the community.

There’s a lot of mystery in location.

It can be the honest difference in tens of thousands of dollars of selling price, if not more.  Why is that?  Especially in Condominium Management we see varying degrees of maintenance and enforcement. One condo unit, identical to another and only separated by a few blocks can sell for much more or less than another.  Why is that? The condition of the exterior walkways, the roofing, the tidiness of the area, the way parking is handled; all contribute to the way a property is perceived and therefore directly affect your selling price.

Location, location, location and condition.

We generally experience a better ‘feeling’  or sense of safety in an area with a Home Owners Association and fees for extra maintenance and control in the area.   Restrictions on the type of housing, the number of trees, the parking by-laws, the snow-shovelling tendencies, the removal of waste, the location of lighting, emergency access routes; everything comes together to create one thing: your community.  I believe each of these items and more can be an expression of ‘broken windows’ in properties and communities throughout Alberta.  We are either a part of making it better or making it worse.  We have a choice to help clean it up or to watch it deteriorate.  What kind of neighbour are you? Evolution and organization within a community leading to watchful eyes and a willingness to speak out about fears or undesirable scenarios.  The alternate option?  I guess seeing where the broken windows can take you is a choice…

During the 1990s violent crime declined across the United States for a number of fairly straightforward reasons. The illegal trade in crack cocaine, which had spawned a great deal of violence among gangs and drug dealers, began to decline. The economy’s dramatic recovery meant that many people who might have been lured into crime got legitimate jobs instead, and the general aging of the population meant that there were fewer people in the age range — males between eighteen and twenty-four — that is responsible for the majority of all violence. The question of why crime declined in New York City, however, is a little more complicated. In the period when the New York epidemic tipped down, the city’s economy hadn’t improved. It was still stagnant. In fact, the city’s poorest neighborhoods had just been hit hard by the welfare cuts of the early 1990s. The waning of the crack cocaine epidemic in New York was clearly a factor, but then again, it had been in steady decline well before crime dipped. As for the aging of the population, because of heavy immigration to New York in the 1980s, the city was getting younger in the 1990s, not older. In any case, all of these trends are long-term changes that one would expect to have gradual effects. In New York the decline was anything but gradual. Something else clearly played a role in reversing New York’s crime epidemic.

The most intriguing candidate for that “something else” is called the Broken Windows theory. Broken Windows was the brainchild of the criminologists James Q. Wilson and George Kelling. Wilson and Kelling argued that crime is the inevitable result of disorder. If a window is broken and left unrepaired, people walking by will conclude that no one cares and no one is in charge. Soon, more windows will be broken, and the sense of anarchy will spread from the building to the street on which it faces, sending a signal that anything goes. In a city, relatively minor problems like graffiti, public disorder, and aggressive panhandling, they write, are all the equivalent of broken windows, invitations to more serious crimes:

Muggers and robbers, whether opportunistic or professional, believe they reduce their chances of being caught or even identified if they operate on streets where potential victims are already intimidated by prevailing conditions. If the neighborhood cannot keep a bothersome panhandler from annoying passersby, the thief may reason, it is even less likely to call the police to identify a potential mugger or to interfere if the mugging actually takes place.

This is an epidemic theory of crime. It says that crime is contagious — just as a fashion trend is contagious — that it can start with a broken window and spread to an entire community. The Tipping Point in this epidemic, though, isn’t a particular kind of person. It’s something physical like graffiti. The impetus to engage in a certain kind of behavior is not coming from a certain kind of person but from a feature of the environment.

In the mid-1980s Kelling was hired by the New York Transit Authority as a consultant, and he urged them to put the Broken Windows theory into practice. They obliged, bringing in a new subway director by the name of David Gunn to oversee a multibillion-dollar rebuilding of the subway system. Many subway advocates, at the time, told Gunn not to worry about graffiti, to focus on the larger questions of crime and subway reliability, and it seemed like reasonable advice. Worrying about graffiti at a time when the entire system was close to collapse seems as pointless as scrubbing the decks of the Titanic as it headed toward the icebergs. But Gunn insisted. “The graffiti was symbolic of the collapse of the system,” he says. “When you looked at the process of rebuilding the organization and morale, you had to win the battle against graffiti. Without winning that battle, all the management reforms and physical changes just weren’t going to happen. We were about to put out new trains that were worth about ten million bucks apiece, and unless we did something to protect them, we knew just what would happen. They, would last one day and then they would be vandalized.”

Gunn drew up a new management structure and a precise set of goals and timetables aimed at cleaning the system line by line, train by train. He started with the number seven train that connects Queens to midtown Manhattan, and began experimenting with new techniques to clean off the paint. On stainless-steel cars, solvents were used. On the painted cars, the graffiti were simply painted over. Gunn made it a rule that there should be no retreat, that once a car was “reclaimed” it should never be allowed to be vandalized again. “We were religious about it,” Gunn said. At the end of the number one line in the Bronx, where the trains stop before turning around and going back to Manhattan, Gunn set up a cleaning station. If a car came in with graffiti, the graffiti had to be removed during the changeover, or the car was removed from service. “Dirty” cars, which hadn’t yet been cleansed of graffiti, were never to be mixed with “clean” cars. The idea was to send an unambiguous message to the vandals themselves.

“We had a yard up in Harlem on one hundred thirty-fifth Street where the trains would lay up over night,” Gunn said. “The kids would come the first night and palm the side of the train white. Then they would come the next night, after it was dry, and draw the outline. Then they would come the third night and color it in. It was a three-day job. We knew the kids would be working on one of the dirty trains, and what we would do is wait for them to finish their mural. Then we’d walk over with rollers and paint it over. The kids would be in tears, but we’d just be going up and down, up and down. It was a message to them. If you want to spend three nights of your time vandalizing a train, fine. But it’s never going to see the light of day.”

Gunn’s graffiti cleanup took from 1984 to 1990. At that point, the Transit Authority hired William Bratton to head the transit police, and the second stage of the reclamation of the subway system began. Bratton was, like Gunn, a disciple of Broken Windows. He describes Kelling, in fact, as his intellectual mentor, and so his first step as police chief was as seemingly quixotic as Gunn’s. With felonies — serious crimes — on the subway system at an all-time high, Bratton decided to crack down on farebeating. Why? Because he believed that, like graffiti, farebeating could be a signal, a small expression of disorder that invited much more serious crimes. An estimated 170,000 people a day were entering the system, by one route or another, without paying a token. Some were kids, who simply jumped over the turnstiles. Others would lean backward on the turnstiles and force their way through. And once one or two or three people began cheating the system, other people —who might never otherwise have considered evading the law — would join in, reasoning that if some people weren’t going to pay, they shouldn’t either, and the problem would snowball. The problem was exacerbated by the fact fare-beating was not easy to fight. Because there was only $1.25 at stake, the transit police didn’t feel it was worth their time to pursue it, particularly when there were plenty of more serious crimes happening down on the platform and in the trains.

Bratton is a colorful, charismatic man, a born leader, and he quickly made his presence felt. His wife stayed behind in Boston, so he was free to work long hours, and he would roam the city on the subway at night, getting a sense of what the problems were and how best to fight them. First, he picked stations where fare-beating was the biggest problem, and put as many as ten policemen in plainclothes at the turnstiles. The team would nab fare-beaters one by one, handcuff them, and leave them standing, in a daisy chain, on the platform until they had a “full catch.” The idea was to signal, as publicly as possible, that the transit police were now serious about cracking down on fare-beaters. Previously, police officers had been wary of pursuing fare-beaters because the arrest, the trip to the station house, the filling out of necessary forms, and the waiting for those forms to be processed took an entire day — all for a crime that usually merited no more than a slap on the wrist. Bratton retrofitted a city bus and turned it into a rolling station house, with its own fax machines, phones, holding pen, and fingerprinting facilities. Soon the turnaround time on an arrest was down to an hour. Bratton also insisted that a check be run on all those arrested. Sure enough, one out of seven arrestees had an outstanding warrant for a previous crime, and one out of twenty was carrying a weapon of some sort. Suddenly it wasn’t hard to convince police officers that tackling fare-beating made sense. “for the cops it was a bonanza,” Bratton writes. “Every arrest was like opening a box of Cracker Jack. What kind of toy am I going to get? Got a gun? Got a knife? Got a warrant? Do we have a murderer here? . ..

After a while the bad guys wised up and began to leave their weapons home and pay their fares.” Under Bratton, the number of ejections from subway stations — for drunkenness, or improper behavior — tripled within his first few months in office. Arrests for misdemeanors, for the kind of minor offenses that had gone unnoticed in the past, went up fivefold between 1990 and 1994. Bratton turned the transit police into an organization focused on the smallest infractions, on the details of life underground.

After the election of Rudolph Giuliani as mayor of New York in 1994, Bratton was appointed head of the New York City Police Department, and he applied the same strategies to the city at large. He instructed his officers to crack down on quality-of-life crimes: on the “squeegee men” who came up to drivers at New York City intersections and demanded money for washing car windows, for example, and on all the other above-ground equivalents of turnstile-jumping and graffiti. “Previous police administration had been handcuffed by restrictions,” Bratton says. “We took the handcuffs off. We stepped up enforcement of the laws against public drunkenness and public urination and arrested repeat violators, including those who threw empty bottles on the street or were involved in even relatively minor damage to property…. If you peed in the street, you were going to jail.” When crime began to fall in the city — as quickly and dramatically as it had in the subways — Bratton and Giuliani pointed to the same cause. Minor, seemingly insignificant quality-of-life crimes, they said, were Tipping Points for violent crime.

Broken Windows theory and the Power of Context are one and the same. They are both based on the premise that an epidemic can be reversed, can be tipped, by tinkering with the smallest details of the immediate environment. This is, if you think about it, quite a radical idea.

– From, ‘The Tipping Point’ by Malcolm Gladwell.

Edmonton Listings continue to Surge, Bargain Sales now Timely.

Thursday, January 14th, 2016

Hi Folks,

Welcome back from holidays! Did you create some resolutions for yourself?  Each year, throughout the holidays I take the time to write down my goals for the upcoming year.  They generally alwas include some sort of exercise, and mental conditioning as well. For the first time in my history; I am actually considering a new type of resolution; to love myself just as I am, no changes.  Wouldn’t that be the Cats’ Meow?  To love yourself, exactly the way you are.  Consider it, I know I am.  While some folks are considering what kind of goals or resolutions they wish to set for themselves, others are moving confidently in the direction of their dreams.  A lot of Edmontonians were looking to change homes in 2015 and the trend is set to continue in 2016.

If you, your friends or family are looking to buy or sell Real Estate, please keep me in mind.  Your referral is the best compliment I can receive; other than the Miss Universe crown. lol

And now the stats:

Last December (2014) we had 3,059 listings for sale.  December of 2015 ended with a total of 5,088 properties for sale in the Greater Edmonton area.  Far too many properties than what is being bought up and the result is a Buyers Market.  This is the strongest buyers market that I have seen in a few years, at 7.14 months of inventory. Last month we only had 5.47 months of inventory and it was still a Buyers Market.

Last December (2014) a total of 1,165 homes sold in the Edmonton area.  This December 713 sold.  About the same number of sales.

Last November (2014) a total of 1,416 new listings came on the market, this year 1,914 new listings arrived.  Compared to last year there are 35% more new listings, and I predict new listings are going to keep high in numbers all through 2016.

Average Days on Market – 62, down 11.3% from last year

Odds of Selling – 713 out of 5,088 listed, down 46.49% from last year

Average Selling Price:

Condo: $248,956, down 2.2% from last month and up 1.5% from last year.

Townhouse: $374,217, up 5.3% from last year and 10.7% more than last month.

Single Family Dwelling: $424,629, down 1.2% from last year and 1.2% from last month and the

Average selling price in the City of Edmonton is $366,221, up 2.3% from last year and down 2.2% from last month.

Home Sales by Price Range: The highest percentage of properties are and have the tendency in Edmonton to sell in the $300,000-$399,999 price range, and this year 34.15% of homes have sold in this price range. Second position goes to the $400,000-$499,999 price range at 20.53%.  Third place is the $200,000-$299,999 and 20.28%. These haven’t changed very much from month to month as this works in with Edmonton average earnings per family.

54 Years average of price increase for the City of Edmonton is 6.98%.

Prices have not gone down in Edmonton since 2011, when we saw a decrease of 1.40%. Prices are up by 1.49% this year.

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Cheers,  Jeanine