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Archive for the ‘Edmonton Communities’ Category

May 2018 – Edmonton Real Estate Market Stats

Saturday, May 12th, 2018
May 2018 Edmonton Real Estate Market Stats

May 2018 Edmonton Real Estate Market Stats

*Stats as of April 30, 2018

The snow is gone and the sales are coming.  The Edmonton residential real Estate average is sitting at a lovely $369,258. Down year over year by 2.48% and up 1.43% from last month.

Residential single family dwellings with an average selling price of $429,116 have decreased 2.39% from last year and increased 1.29% over last month.

Condo dwellings, continuing on a downward trend, dropping 2.39% to $247,405, yet increased 5.63% from last month as well.

Rowhouses and Duplexes are sitting at an average of $323,906 down 9.48% from last year and down 7.33% from last month.

Highest sales for April of 2018?

Single Family – $1,440,000

Condos – $850,000

Duplex/Rowhouse – $597,500

Average days on market?

Single Family: 52 Days, up four from last year

Condos: 66 Days, up six from last year

Duplex/Rowhouse: 59 Days, down five from last year.

Quantity of New Listings?

3,470 new listings for a total of 8,788 listings on market, an increase year over year of 10.97%. Anyone who tells you there aren’t enough listings in Edmonton, does not know the market at all.  Watch out for all those claims on postcards and in the news folks.

How many Sales in April 2018?

1,555 sales – which shows 5.65Months of inventory on market, definitely a buyers market.

Price your homes right.  It will matter.

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April 2018 – #YEG Real Estate Market Reports

Friday, April 6th, 2018
YEG Real Estate Market Report - April 2018

YEG Real Estate Market Report – April 2018

The Residential selling price in Edmonton has creeped up over the years, this month sitting at $374,264 a 0.77% increase year over year and down 0.03% from last month.  The market is warming up, just like the outdoors.

Residential single family dwellings with an average selling price of $444,091 have increased 1.06% over last year and 0.43% over last month.

Condo dwellings, not such good news for us, but it could be worse, year to year we have dropped 3.47% to $243,212, down from last month as well.

Rowhouses and Duplexes are sitting at an average of $349,537 down 0.53% from last year and down 1.44% from last month.

Highest sales for March?

Single Family – $2,610,000

Condos – $1,279,500

Duplex/Rowhouse – $944,000

Average days on market?

Single Family: 49 Days, down two from last year

Condos: 67 Days, down five from last year

Duplex/Rowhouse: 61 Days, creeping up 4 days from last year

Quantity of New Listings?

3,459 new listings for a total of 7,963 listings on market, an increase year over year of 13.26%. Anyone who tells you there aren’t enough listings in Edmonton, does not know the market at all.  Watch out for all those claims on postcards and in the news folks.

Sales in March?

1,294 sales – which shows 6.15 Months of inventory on market, definitely a buyers market.

Price your homes right.  It will matter.

Doing our Part for the Community

Monday, April 2nd, 2018
Remax and the Stollery Childrens Hospital

Remax and the Stollery Childrens Hospital

The Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation is a proud member of Children’s Miracle Network. This is a non-profit organization dedicated to saving and improving the lives of children in local communities. It raises funds for more than 170 children’s hospitals, 14 of which are in Canada.
The Foundation’s relationship with Children’s Miracle Network brings with it many special partnerships with national corporate partners, who make a big difference in the lives of children each year through their fundraising efforts.
When you see the Children’s Miracle Network balloon symbol in Edmonton and northern Alberta, that event or activity is raising funds for the Stollery Children’s Hospital.  We hope you’ll support these programs and help us to send more children home each year.

14621 – 121 Street – Pending in #YEG – #YEGRE

Monday, April 2nd, 2018
14621 - 121 Street - Pending in #YEG - #YEGRE

14621 – 121 Street – Pending in #YEG – #YEGRE

 

 

purrfect_properties_edmonton #pending #yegre #remaxhustle #realtorlife #springmarket #realty #callaghan #Caernarvon

Thanks to great work from Shelley Confurious of Professional Realty Group.

 

So happy that these clients can finally move onto their dream home in Calgary.  Deposit is in and now we hurry up and wait.

 

Remax #YEG Market Share – 2017 Year Totals

Sunday, April 1st, 2018
Remax #YEG Market Share - 2017 Year Totals

Remax #YEG Market Share – 2017 Year Totals

Wondering who you should list or buy your home with?  I hope this chart helps you to make an informed decision.  Do the numbers show a good return on your investment as the Seller or Buyer?  Will you have an experienced Agent?

RE/MAX – 975 Members – 43.75% Total Market Share

Royal Lepage – 346 Members – 10.71% Market Share

Realty Executives – 111 Members – 9.22% Market Share

Century 21 – 317 Members – 7.65% Market Share

Maxwell Realty – 496 Members – 5.54% Market Share

Homes & Garden – 224 Members – 1.98% Market Share

Comfree – 14 Members – 1.97% Market Share

Now Real Estate – 106 Members – 1.72% Market Share

2% Realty – 23 Members – 1.35% Market Share

Coldwell Banker – 40 Members 1.29% Market Share

 

Whether buying or selling your home, you have several decisions to make.

Should you work with a REALTOR®? Which real estate company will provide the best value? Which REALTOR® within that company will be best suited to help you through the process?

We reached out to the RE/MAX Influencers: A panel consisting of RE/MAX Sales Associates from throughout Canada. We asked them: Why should a consumer work with RE/MAX when he/she has so many options out there?

The Brand

Chances are, you would have a hard time finding someone who has never heard of “RE/MAX.” With 100,000 Sales Associates in nearly 100 countries worldwide, the RE/MAX name—along with the iconic balloon—represents a professional organization that has become an industry leader.

RE/MAX also advertises through many mediums, including: Television, print, online and physical signs such as NHL rink boards. This high level of exposure will go to work for you when listing your property. Many RE/MAX Sales Associates are also affiliated with the Children’s Miracle Network; therefore, the sale of a RE/MAX Miracle Home will help support your local children’s hospital. According to ComScore, RE/MAX Canada also leads other real estate brands with its significant traffic to remax.ca.

“In an uncertain market, consumers become less speculative. Instead, they rely on proven brands to reinforce their efforts to manage one of their most important investments. They rely on the experience and expertise that has made RE/MAX one of the most recognizable brands in the real estate world.”

Sales Associates

RE/MAX Sales Associates have the experience to get the job done in today’s market.

The vast majority of our membership are full-time agents who are experts in their local communities. They work hard and are committed to help their clients through the home buying or selling process. *RE/MAX agents sell more real estate than any other Canadian brand.

“RE/MAX is often a collection of the top REALTORS® in any given marketplace. RE/MAX also has an international network: This type of network could be where the buyer of my client’s home comes from.”

Training and Support

RE/MAX supports all of its Sales Associates with comprehensive training and ongoing support.

Our affiliates are highly skilled and educated, and they have the latest tools and technology at their fingertips. They are motivated to put this knowledge and experience to work for you!

*Source: MMR Strategy Group study to RE Buyers & Sellers

Is this another Ugly and Costly condo trend?

Monday, December 4th, 2017

Reprinted From the Alberta Condo Network Newsletter

Alberta Condo Network - Redacted Condo Documents and the Costly Trend

Alberta Condo Network – Redacted Condo Documents and the Costly Trend

Here’s ANOTHER UGLY and POTENTIALLY COSTLY condo trend?
We’re hearing of condo boards, managers, lawyers, and other condo industry insiders, arbitrarily, at will, with no permission from condo owners, or approval from anyone to do so, selectively and subjectively “REDACTING” (fancy word for removing, eliminating, doctoring, sanitizing, not disclosing) information related to: events, issues, actions, and decisions made by condo boards as they represent our condo corporations which are our homes.

This redacting often takes place on condo board meeting minutes or AGM minutes although it is not limited to those documents. The rationale used for “doctoring” or sanitizing documents is that disclosing certain information might violate the Privacy Act or information that is “legal”. That rationale, on something this serious for condo owners, is nonsense because there is a way to describe sensitive issues if the political and industry will was there to do it!

This redacting trend could be particularly damaging to both NEW and EXISTING condo owners because it could cause significant legal and financial grief. Here’s what could happen…
Consider that the purpose of recording minutes, of any kind, for any entity, is to capture a TRUTHFUL and COMPLETE HISTORY OF THE ENTITY: in our case, A TRUTHFUL AND COMPLETE recording of events, issues, actions and decisions made by our condo boards on behalf of our condo corporation/our homes.
Wouldn’t you want to know if your condo board (among MANY other things):

(more…)

Your Virtual Tour for 1419 Cunningham Drive SW – Condo For Sale

Tuesday, May 16th, 2017

1419 Cunningham Drive SW – Callaghan Landing

Dual Master Home For Sale

(more…)

How Safe is that Edmonton Neighbourhood?

Friday, April 22nd, 2016

Does it really matter what I think about a neighbourhood?  Maybe a bit, especially if you are new to town.  The hing is, every person on the planet has a different sense and taste for what they find comfortable, safe and even scary.  Never, have I heard the words, I don’t care about the neighbourhood. Okay, maybe once, shout out to Ben here, lol. You still have to invite me over so I can see what you’ve done….

You see, I have found perspective questions and answers very difficult to truthfully answer for another person.  I encourage my clients to decide for themselves, through research and education.  That being said, if you know me, you know I am not afraid to speak my mind and have some definite views on quite a lot about properties and real estate, lol.

I was reading an article where a US citizen had purchased a property and told the Sellers REALTOR® that they wanted to live in a safe and quiet neighbourhood.  They bought from the Sellers using the Sellers REALTOR® and are now upset; they believe there is a meth lab next door and they claim the REALTOR® didn’t tell them the truth.  I’d like to say, there are ways to find out and help yourself.

Ask the neighbours. actually knock on their doors before you buy.  Perhaps if the buyer had gone up to the door and asked questions about the neighbourhood before they bought, they may have noticed something…

A great tool I love to let folks know about is the Edmonton Neighbourhood Crime Map, created by the Edmonton Police.  What an awesome tool, shout out to the Edmonton Police Department for this handy web page:

http://crimemapping.edmontonpolice.ca/

I’m fairly particular about what colors of dots I want near my home.  It is a given that I don’t want to see any, but the truth is there is crime around the corners in every large city.  I won’t want a yellow or grey dot in my neighbourhood, without a doubt. Folks, you can check any neighbourhood out in Edmonton and it will give you a map break down of what has happened for up to the last 60 days.  If you are looking for a home in a new area, use this tool.  It is very valuable!

Now that’s the Cats Meow in Real Estate!

Broken Windows: an interesting Theory on Crime in Edmonton.

Tuesday, February 9th, 2016

Hi Folks,

Some of you may have read Malcolms’ book the Tipping Point and you can relate to the lessons we can find within the story.  I like this Theory.  I like that it becomes an expression of how well the community is cared for and how much care the residents show for the community.

There’s a lot of mystery in location.

It can be the honest difference in tens of thousands of dollars of selling price, if not more.  Why is that?  Especially in Condominium Management we see varying degrees of maintenance and enforcement. One condo unit, identical to another and only separated by a few blocks can sell for much more or less than another.  Why is that? The condition of the exterior walkways, the roofing, the tidiness of the area, the way parking is handled; all contribute to the way a property is perceived and therefore directly affect your selling price.

Location, location, location and condition.

We generally experience a better ‘feeling’  or sense of safety in an area with a Home Owners Association and fees for extra maintenance and control in the area.   Restrictions on the type of housing, the number of trees, the parking by-laws, the snow-shovelling tendencies, the removal of waste, the location of lighting, emergency access routes; everything comes together to create one thing: your community.  I believe each of these items and more can be an expression of ‘broken windows’ in properties and communities throughout Alberta.  We are either a part of making it better or making it worse.  We have a choice to help clean it up or to watch it deteriorate.  What kind of neighbour are you? Evolution and organization within a community leading to watchful eyes and a willingness to speak out about fears or undesirable scenarios.  The alternate option?  I guess seeing where the broken windows can take you is a choice…

During the 1990s violent crime declined across the United States for a number of fairly straightforward reasons. The illegal trade in crack cocaine, which had spawned a great deal of violence among gangs and drug dealers, began to decline. The economy’s dramatic recovery meant that many people who might have been lured into crime got legitimate jobs instead, and the general aging of the population meant that there were fewer people in the age range — males between eighteen and twenty-four — that is responsible for the majority of all violence. The question of why crime declined in New York City, however, is a little more complicated. In the period when the New York epidemic tipped down, the city’s economy hadn’t improved. It was still stagnant. In fact, the city’s poorest neighborhoods had just been hit hard by the welfare cuts of the early 1990s. The waning of the crack cocaine epidemic in New York was clearly a factor, but then again, it had been in steady decline well before crime dipped. As for the aging of the population, because of heavy immigration to New York in the 1980s, the city was getting younger in the 1990s, not older. In any case, all of these trends are long-term changes that one would expect to have gradual effects. In New York the decline was anything but gradual. Something else clearly played a role in reversing New York’s crime epidemic.

The most intriguing candidate for that “something else” is called the Broken Windows theory. Broken Windows was the brainchild of the criminologists James Q. Wilson and George Kelling. Wilson and Kelling argued that crime is the inevitable result of disorder. If a window is broken and left unrepaired, people walking by will conclude that no one cares and no one is in charge. Soon, more windows will be broken, and the sense of anarchy will spread from the building to the street on which it faces, sending a signal that anything goes. In a city, relatively minor problems like graffiti, public disorder, and aggressive panhandling, they write, are all the equivalent of broken windows, invitations to more serious crimes:

Muggers and robbers, whether opportunistic or professional, believe they reduce their chances of being caught or even identified if they operate on streets where potential victims are already intimidated by prevailing conditions. If the neighborhood cannot keep a bothersome panhandler from annoying passersby, the thief may reason, it is even less likely to call the police to identify a potential mugger or to interfere if the mugging actually takes place.

This is an epidemic theory of crime. It says that crime is contagious — just as a fashion trend is contagious — that it can start with a broken window and spread to an entire community. The Tipping Point in this epidemic, though, isn’t a particular kind of person. It’s something physical like graffiti. The impetus to engage in a certain kind of behavior is not coming from a certain kind of person but from a feature of the environment.

In the mid-1980s Kelling was hired by the New York Transit Authority as a consultant, and he urged them to put the Broken Windows theory into practice. They obliged, bringing in a new subway director by the name of David Gunn to oversee a multibillion-dollar rebuilding of the subway system. Many subway advocates, at the time, told Gunn not to worry about graffiti, to focus on the larger questions of crime and subway reliability, and it seemed like reasonable advice. Worrying about graffiti at a time when the entire system was close to collapse seems as pointless as scrubbing the decks of the Titanic as it headed toward the icebergs. But Gunn insisted. “The graffiti was symbolic of the collapse of the system,” he says. “When you looked at the process of rebuilding the organization and morale, you had to win the battle against graffiti. Without winning that battle, all the management reforms and physical changes just weren’t going to happen. We were about to put out new trains that were worth about ten million bucks apiece, and unless we did something to protect them, we knew just what would happen. They, would last one day and then they would be vandalized.”

Gunn drew up a new management structure and a precise set of goals and timetables aimed at cleaning the system line by line, train by train. He started with the number seven train that connects Queens to midtown Manhattan, and began experimenting with new techniques to clean off the paint. On stainless-steel cars, solvents were used. On the painted cars, the graffiti were simply painted over. Gunn made it a rule that there should be no retreat, that once a car was “reclaimed” it should never be allowed to be vandalized again. “We were religious about it,” Gunn said. At the end of the number one line in the Bronx, where the trains stop before turning around and going back to Manhattan, Gunn set up a cleaning station. If a car came in with graffiti, the graffiti had to be removed during the changeover, or the car was removed from service. “Dirty” cars, which hadn’t yet been cleansed of graffiti, were never to be mixed with “clean” cars. The idea was to send an unambiguous message to the vandals themselves.

“We had a yard up in Harlem on one hundred thirty-fifth Street where the trains would lay up over night,” Gunn said. “The kids would come the first night and palm the side of the train white. Then they would come the next night, after it was dry, and draw the outline. Then they would come the third night and color it in. It was a three-day job. We knew the kids would be working on one of the dirty trains, and what we would do is wait for them to finish their mural. Then we’d walk over with rollers and paint it over. The kids would be in tears, but we’d just be going up and down, up and down. It was a message to them. If you want to spend three nights of your time vandalizing a train, fine. But it’s never going to see the light of day.”

Gunn’s graffiti cleanup took from 1984 to 1990. At that point, the Transit Authority hired William Bratton to head the transit police, and the second stage of the reclamation of the subway system began. Bratton was, like Gunn, a disciple of Broken Windows. He describes Kelling, in fact, as his intellectual mentor, and so his first step as police chief was as seemingly quixotic as Gunn’s. With felonies — serious crimes — on the subway system at an all-time high, Bratton decided to crack down on farebeating. Why? Because he believed that, like graffiti, farebeating could be a signal, a small expression of disorder that invited much more serious crimes. An estimated 170,000 people a day were entering the system, by one route or another, without paying a token. Some were kids, who simply jumped over the turnstiles. Others would lean backward on the turnstiles and force their way through. And once one or two or three people began cheating the system, other people —who might never otherwise have considered evading the law — would join in, reasoning that if some people weren’t going to pay, they shouldn’t either, and the problem would snowball. The problem was exacerbated by the fact fare-beating was not easy to fight. Because there was only $1.25 at stake, the transit police didn’t feel it was worth their time to pursue it, particularly when there were plenty of more serious crimes happening down on the platform and in the trains.

Bratton is a colorful, charismatic man, a born leader, and he quickly made his presence felt. His wife stayed behind in Boston, so he was free to work long hours, and he would roam the city on the subway at night, getting a sense of what the problems were and how best to fight them. First, he picked stations where fare-beating was the biggest problem, and put as many as ten policemen in plainclothes at the turnstiles. The team would nab fare-beaters one by one, handcuff them, and leave them standing, in a daisy chain, on the platform until they had a “full catch.” The idea was to signal, as publicly as possible, that the transit police were now serious about cracking down on fare-beaters. Previously, police officers had been wary of pursuing fare-beaters because the arrest, the trip to the station house, the filling out of necessary forms, and the waiting for those forms to be processed took an entire day — all for a crime that usually merited no more than a slap on the wrist. Bratton retrofitted a city bus and turned it into a rolling station house, with its own fax machines, phones, holding pen, and fingerprinting facilities. Soon the turnaround time on an arrest was down to an hour. Bratton also insisted that a check be run on all those arrested. Sure enough, one out of seven arrestees had an outstanding warrant for a previous crime, and one out of twenty was carrying a weapon of some sort. Suddenly it wasn’t hard to convince police officers that tackling fare-beating made sense. “for the cops it was a bonanza,” Bratton writes. “Every arrest was like opening a box of Cracker Jack. What kind of toy am I going to get? Got a gun? Got a knife? Got a warrant? Do we have a murderer here? . ..

After a while the bad guys wised up and began to leave their weapons home and pay their fares.” Under Bratton, the number of ejections from subway stations — for drunkenness, or improper behavior — tripled within his first few months in office. Arrests for misdemeanors, for the kind of minor offenses that had gone unnoticed in the past, went up fivefold between 1990 and 1994. Bratton turned the transit police into an organization focused on the smallest infractions, on the details of life underground.

After the election of Rudolph Giuliani as mayor of New York in 1994, Bratton was appointed head of the New York City Police Department, and he applied the same strategies to the city at large. He instructed his officers to crack down on quality-of-life crimes: on the “squeegee men” who came up to drivers at New York City intersections and demanded money for washing car windows, for example, and on all the other above-ground equivalents of turnstile-jumping and graffiti. “Previous police administration had been handcuffed by restrictions,” Bratton says. “We took the handcuffs off. We stepped up enforcement of the laws against public drunkenness and public urination and arrested repeat violators, including those who threw empty bottles on the street or were involved in even relatively minor damage to property…. If you peed in the street, you were going to jail.” When crime began to fall in the city — as quickly and dramatically as it had in the subways — Bratton and Giuliani pointed to the same cause. Minor, seemingly insignificant quality-of-life crimes, they said, were Tipping Points for violent crime.

Broken Windows theory and the Power of Context are one and the same. They are both based on the premise that an epidemic can be reversed, can be tipped, by tinkering with the smallest details of the immediate environment. This is, if you think about it, quite a radical idea.

– From, ‘The Tipping Point’ by Malcolm Gladwell.

Why Live in Secord, West Edmonton?

Sunday, May 11th, 2014

The community of Secord was established in 2007 and consists of townhomes and semi-detached houses. While there is still much of the community to be developed, it lies in a commuter-friendly Westside location. This alone has made it an attractive place to live but the commute isn’t even the half of it. Featuring beautiful pathways, expert landscaping and a plethora of hardwood trees, the neighbourhood is aesthetically pleasing and includes a reflecting pond.

Here’s your Guide to Home Buying and Selling in Secord, Edmonton.